Excerpts from The Annual Monitor for 1894, or Obituary of the Members of the Society of Friends in Great Britain and Ireland, for the year 1893.

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Dublin Core

Title

Excerpts from The Annual Monitor for 1894, or Obituary of the Members of the Society of Friends in Great Britain and Ireland, for the year 1893.

Subject

Thought Leaders

Description

The excerpts from the obituary gave detailed information about the works that Edmund did as an activist for abolition especially through his societies.

Creator

William Alexander, Sarah Backhouse, Samuel Tuke, Benjamin Seebohm, Esther Wheeler Seebohm,Joseph Stickney Sewell, John Newby,William Robinson, and Francish Arnold Knight

Source

archives.org
Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center

Publisher

London: Barrett, Sons & Co.

Date

1813

Contributor

Alex Weaver

Rights

Public Domain. Not in Copyright.

Format

JPeg

Language

English

Type

Text

Identifier

Identifier: annualmonitororo1894alex
Identifier-ark: ark:/13960/t85h7t948
https://archive.org/details/annualmonitororo1894alex

Coverage

United States 19th Century

Text Item Type Metadata

Text

in need, and with words of cheer to encourage
the troubled heart to trust in the perfect wisdom
of God. It was teaching to see her patient
submission to the Divine will in her affliction of bUndness, and to hear her recount her many mercies, of which she used to say, " I am so
unworthy."
Ellen Stone, 43 12 7 mo. 1893
Maidstone. Wife of Thomas Stone,
Hannah Stott, 72 21 5 mo. 1893
Bochdale, Wife of James Stott.
Edmund Stuege, 84 28 6 mo. 1893
Charlburj/.
Lydia Sturge, 85 19 12 mo. 1892 Charlbwry. Wife of Edmund Sturge. Edmund Sturge was the youngest son of
Joseph and Mary Sturge, and was born at Olveston, near Bristol, in 1808. He went to
school, first at Thornbury and then at Eochester. Of the latter place a Friend remarks :—" I was
not there with him, but I well remember the
high character which he had left of kindness
and uprightness, and of being a popular and
perfectly gentlemanly boy." On leaving school
he went to live in Birmingham, where he subse
quently joined his brother John in the business
of manufacturing chemist.
In his letter, acknowledging the address
presented to him and his wife by the British and
Foreign Anti- Slavery Society, on their Golden "Wedding, he says:—"My early interest in the Anti- Slavery cause was due to my residing in the family of my brother, the late Joseph Sturge,
when, as early as 1824, the agitation was com
menced for the extinction of British colonial
slaver3^ Most fearful were, humanly speaking,
the odds against it, and very fanatical it seemed."
After the visit of Joseph Sturge with other
Anti- Slavery Friends to the West Indies, in 1836, Edmimd Stiirge took active part in issuing the
luminous report which they brought back, and
in the other measures so effectually taken to rouse the country against the " apprenticeship " system. When the object of the Central Negro
Emancipation Committee had been attained, by
the extinction of slavery in British dominions
in 1838, a new organization was formed, under
the name of the British and Foreign Anti
Slavery Society, for the universal abolition of
the slave trade and slavery. Of this Society Edmund Sturge became a member in 1840, member of committee in 1860, honorary secre
tary in 1870, permanent chairman from 1882 to
1891, and vice-president till his death.
In 1841 Edmiuid Sturge married Lydia,
biographical notice of her which appeared in
one of the Oxford papers, " Whether in sick
ness or health, she was a welcome visitor in all
homes, rich or poor, and no one was omitted from her visitation." Some time after her death a Poor Law Guardian remarked that the
poor had often told him that they had never
missed anyone so much as Mrs. Sturge.
In 1876, having retired from business, Ed
miuid Sturge devoted his time gratuitously to the work of the Anti- Slavery Society, and up ta
the last few years, spent most of his time in
London, attending in the lobby of the House of Commons two or three days a week throughout
the Parliamentary session, and calling at the
various Government offices when important
questions demanded the consideration of the
Government. Probably, neither his colleagues
in the work of the Anti- Slavery Society, nor
even the members of his own family, fully
realized all the painstaking attention to detail
and unobtrusive self-sacrifice which such a life
involved. But the life which he had chosen,
because the Lord had chosen it for him, was
" to loose the bands of wickedness, to undo the
heavy burdens, and to let the oppressed go free,
and that ye break every yoke ; " and for this

Original Format

Originally paper.

Geolocation

Citation

William Alexander, Sarah Backhouse, Samuel Tuke, Benjamin Seebohm, Esther Wheeler Seebohm,Joseph Stickney Sewell, John Newby,William Robinson, and Francish Arnold Knight, “Excerpts from The Annual Monitor for 1894, or Obituary of the Members of the Society of Friends in Great Britain and Ireland, for the year 1893.,” Digital Histories, accessed March 2, 2024, https://digitalhistories.kennesaw.edu/items/show/39.